How does washing your clothes lead to plastic pollution in the Arctic?

Every time we do the laundry, hundreds of thousands of tiny fibres – known as microfibres – are washed off our clothes, down the drain and into the environment.

Recent research has found high levels of microplastic fibres polluting the Arctic Ocean. These fibres most likely come from washing synthetic clothes in Europe and North America.

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In Canada, the Ocean Wise Conservation Association found microplastics in 96 of 97 seawater samples taken from across the polar region. Ninety-two per cent of the microplastics found are fibres, and 73% originate from polyester clothing. The majority of the samples collected were from 3-8 metres below the surface, where much marine life feeds.

The 3-8m layer of seawater is a biologically important area where we find phytoplankton, zooplankton, small fish, big fish, seabirds and marine mammals, looking for food. Large animals such as turtles, albatross, seals and whales die through eating plastic, and there is no reason to think it was different for the smaller ones.

Another study by Ocean Wise in 2019, estimated 3,500tn plastic microfibers from clothes washing in the US and Canada end up in the sea each year; the equivalent in weight to over 20 blue whales!

As well as the fibres found at the North Pole, plastic exists at the deepest point on Earth, the Mariana Trench, and Mount Everest’s peak. Plastic injures wildlife when it is mistaken for food. People also consume microplastics through food and water and breathe them in. However, the health impact of this consumption is not currently known.

Most of the water that flows into the Arctic comes from the Atlantic Ocean. The new research has found more microplastic fibres nearer the Atlantic, than the Pacific Ocean. As you can see from the map showing ocean current below, the North Atlantic Drift transports microplastics released into the North Atlantic.

Major ocean currents

Major ocean currents

What is the Impact of ocean life ingesting microplastics?

Research by The University of Exeter has shown that tiny marine animals called zooplankton, a vital food source for many larger animals like fish and whales, can eat microplastics. When Zooplankton eat microplastics they consume less of their normal food, meaning they get less energy from their diet. This leads to less energy for growth and reproduction. At this point, the microplastics enter the food chain.

As larger animals consume plankton, the concentration of plastic increases. Chemicals attached to microplastics can increase liver toxicity and other pathological changes.

Microfibers fill the bellies of fish, and, while the plastic remains in their guts, the toxins that microfibers contain can migrate into fishes’ flesh, consumed in turn by humans. Researchers found that about 25 percent of individual fish and 67 percent of all species intended for human consumption contained plastic debris, the majority being microfibers.

There is the potential for microfibers to have a negative impact on the fishing industry in the future. Catches may decline due to a breakdown in the ocean food chain. Additionally, demand for seafood may reduce as people become more aware of the impacts of microfibers.

There are, however, economic opportunities in finding solutions to reducing microfiber emissions in the design of innovative laundry traps.

What can we do to reduce the release of microplastic into the sea?

We all have a role to play in reducing microplastic levels in our oceans. As consumers, we can: 

  • wash clothes less often (give them the sniff test before putting them in the wash!)
  • air dry clothes rather than using the tumble drier. This is because tumble drying weakens clothes and makes them more likely to shed microplastics when washed.
  • choose clothes made from natural fibres such as cotton
  • fill our washing machines (the more room clothes have the more likely microfibres will break off)

Population Changes in South Korea

Population Changes in South Korea

South Korea’s birth rate has fallen for the first time in its history. As a high-income country, South Korea is battling an ageing population and low birth-rates.

An ageing population is when more people than ever live longer, often with more complex medical conditions. An ageing population increases the dependency ratio and means that the government has to pay more in benefits to people who often do not have the ability to pump money back into the economy.

The latest census (a count of all people and households) figures indicate South Korea’s total population stood at 51,829,023 at the end of December 2020. This is a reduction of 20,838 from the previous year.

Over the previous decade, South Korea’s population had increased every year, although that growth rate had decreased by 1.49% in 2010 to 0.05% by 2019.

During 2020 the country recorded 275,815 births in 2020, compared with 307,764 deaths.

If current trends persist, the government predicts South Korea’s population will drop to 39 million by 2067, when more than 46% of the population will be aged over 64.

Demographic transition

The animation below shows changes in South Korea’s population structure between 1950 and 2019. The animation clearly shows an increase in life expectancy (more people living to an older age) and a decrease in the proportion of younger people (as the birth rate decreases).

South Korea is undergoing an extreme, rapid example of what demographers (people who study population) call ‘demographic transition’. This is a period of population growth, decline and eventual stabilisation that occurs as countries get richer. For South Korea, this means both a large, rapidly ageing population and a low marriage and birth rate that don’t adequately replace the dying generations.

The demographic transition model attempts to show the population changes a country experiences as it develops.

In later stages of the demographic transition, health care improvements generally lead to a population with an extended life expectancy. That is exactly what is happening in South Korea, where life expectancy has increased rapidly in the second half of the 20th Century amid industrialisation.

In the first half of the 1950s, life expectancy was just shorter than 42 years on average (37 for men, 47 for women). Today, the numbers look radically different. South Korea now has one of the world’s highest life expectancies – ranked twelfth highest for 2015-2020, equal with Iceland. The average baby born in South Korea can now expect to live to 82 years (specifically 79 for men, and 85 for women).

In contrast, the global average is 72 years (nearly 70 for men, 74 for women).

In 1950, less than 3% of the population were aged 65 and over. Today, that number is at 15%. By the mid-2060s, the UN forecasts the percentage of those older than 65s will peak at more than 40%. The numbers paint a picture of a very aged society.

And with low birth rates, fewer marriages and longer lives, the trends combine to create a South Korean population that is actually ageing faster than any other developed country.

Why is South Korea’s population in decline?

South Korea has the lowest fertility rate in the world.

The average South Korean woman has just 1.1 children, lower than any other country. (For contrast, the global average is around 2.5 children.) This rate has been declining steadily: between the early 1950s and today, the fertility rate in South Korea dropped from 5.6 to 1.1 children per woman.

One reason for this is because, in South Korea, women struggle to achieve a balance between work and other life demands.

It has been suggested there is increasing opposition among South Korean women to conform to traditions of raising children and caring for ageing in-laws while husbands work.

South Korean women aren’t simply choosing to have fewer children – some are opting to forego romantic relationships entirely. An increasing number are choosing never to marry at all, turning their backs on legal partnerships – and even casual relationships – in favour of having independent lives and careers in what can still be a sexist society despite economic advances.

Soaring house prices are another major issue. Rapidly rising property prices mean a greater proportion of income is spent on mortgages. Also, young couples are put off having children because they are expensive to raise.

What issues are associated with a declining, ageing population?

Apart from increased pressure on public spending as demand for healthcare systems and pensions rise, a declining youth population also leads to labour shortages that directly impact the economy.

What is South Korea doing to address the issue of a declining, ageing population?

Like Japan, which also has a declining population, the government is under pressure to address the long-term issues caused by a rapidly ageing society.

The South Korean government recently announced initiatives to encourage couples to have bigger families, including a one-off payment of 1m won (£675) for pregnant women and monthly cash allowances for children aged under 12 months.

However, critics say the measures do little to tackle much bigger financial obstacles to having more children, such as high education and housing costs.

New Sea Defences at Withernsea

Through the support of Internet Geography Plus subscribers, we can bring you up to date case study information such as this. Please consider supporting us with an Internet Geography Plus subscription

Withernsea is a town located on the Holderness Coast in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The front of Withernsea has extensive coastal defences including a sea wall, groynes and rock armour. To the south of Withernsea, the sea defences have been extended several times using rock armour. Beyond the sea defences, rates of erosion have increased because beach material is not being replaced as groynes trap sediment being transported by longshore drift along the front of Withernsea. As the beach in this area is very gently the North Sea reaches the base of the cliffs even during neap tides, leading to increased cliff erosion. This stretch of land is some of the most rapidly eroding along the Holderness Coast.

Withernsea - Terminal Groyne Effect

Withernsea – Terminal Groyne Effect (image was taken prior to the extension of rock armour in 2020)

The increased rate of erosion has led to the rapid loss of land, particularly along the front of the Golden Sands Holiday Park. More than 20-holiday homes have had to be either demolished or moved in the last few years. Also under threat is the main road connecting the village of Holmpton to the town of Withernsea. 

Erosion on this section of the Withernsea coastline has historically been at an average of around 4m per year, but in recent years this has increased to approximately 6m per year in places, with 2019 seeing around 12m of erosion opposite the frontage of the Golden Sands Holiday Park.

Erosion at Golden Sands Holiday Park between 2018 and 2020

To protect Holmpton Road, local houses and businesses being lost to coastal erosion, new sea defences have been installed. Four hundred metres of rock armour has been installed along this stretch of coast. During 2020 just under 70,000 tonnes of anorthosite, a rock similar to granite, was transported from Norway to the site off Golden Sands Holiday Park.  The project will protect about 70 homes and more than 250-holiday chalets and static caravans.

A £3m grant, which allowed the £7 million scheme to go ahead after other bids had failed, was provided by the European Regional Development Fund at the end of 2019.

The rock was transported from the quayside quarry in Rekefjord, on the southern coast of Norway, in 5000-tonne shipments by barge. The rocks were then dropped from the barge using heavy machinery when weather conditions were favourable. When the tide went out the rock was then transported up the beach. 

Rock being dropped from a barge

The majority of the rocks weigh between six and ten tonnes, but some reached as much as fifteen tonnes. The boulders were used to create an interlocking rock structure, designed to prevent the sea from eroding the cliffs. This is thought to be amongst the largest used in such defences around the UK.

Rocks of this size were required to withstand the rough seas that this stretch of coastline can experience, both now and in future, should climate change produce the expected worsening of sea conditions. Rock armour is an interlocking but porous structure that has proven to be effective at withstanding wave action, which is the primary cause of the areas rapid coastal erosion.

The cliffs to the south of Withernsea have been re-profiled, and rock armour has been placed onto the newly gently sloping cliffs and along their base. 

Cliff reprofiling and the first installation of rock armour

Construction started in May 2020 and was completed on 17th December 2020.

Completed coastal defences at Withernsea

Completed coastal defences at Withernsea on 17th December 2020.

It may take some time for aerial images on Google Maps to update to include the new rock armour at Withernsea, However, the image below shows the beachside outline of the new defences. In some places, the rock armour is 30m wide!

GPS outline of the new defences at Withernsea

GPS outline of the new defences at Withernsea

Rates of erosion are expected to increase to the south of the new defences.

Photo gallery

This gallery will be updated over the coming months. Feel free to use these images in your classroom. Please remember to credit www.internetgeography.net. If you would like to use these images in the public domain or for commercial purposes, please contact us.

Typhoon Hagibis Online Resources

Typhoon Hagibis has brought deadly flooding and landslides to large parts of Japan.

Hagibis – meaning “speed” in the Philippine language Tagalog – is Japan’s biggest typhoon in six decades.

It hit the Izu Peninsula, south-west of Tokyo, shortly before 19:00 local time (10:00 GMT) on Saturday, before continuing to move up the eastern coast of Japan’s main island.

Typhoons

Hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones: What’s the difference?

Cause of Typhoon Hagibis

Japan gets ready for Typhoon Hagibis – BBC Newsround 

Typhoon Hagibis bears down on Japan

Preparation for Typhoon Hagibis

Japan orders evacuations as Typhoon Hagibis arrives – The Guardian

Government preparing for Typhoon Hagibis – Japan Times




Impact of Typhoon Hagibis

Typhoon Hagibis: Storm biggest to hit Japan in decades – BBC

Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from the storm – BBC

Typhoon Hagibis in pictures by the BBC

Rains, tornado, earthquake: Typhoon Hagibis forecast to be Japan’s worst in 6 decades – USA Today

Typhoon Hagibis: Japan deploys military rescuers as deadly storm hits – BBC

As Typhoon Hagibis apprached Japan a magnitude 5.3 earthquake shook southern Japan. The earthquake and the typhoon were seperate events and were not linked.

Typhoon Hagibis Slams Into Japan After Landslides, Floods and a Quake

Immediate Response to Typhoon Hagibis

Rugby World Cup 2019: Canada players help recovery effort after Namibia match cancelled – BBC Sport

Typhoon Hagibis: Japan deploys military rescuers as deadly storm hits – BBC

Other resources

Earth Nul School – Wind map 

 

Geography in the News Quiz – September 2019

Have you got what it takes to smash our September 2019 geography in the news quiz?

Name the hurricane that devastated the Bahamas in early September.

Correct! Wrong!

Which member of the royal family announced his use of carbon off-setting in early September?

Correct! Wrong!

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex practise carbon offsetting in their private travel. Carbon offsetting allows passengers to pay extra to help compensate for the carbon emissions produced from their flights.

Below is a headline from an article on the Independent news website. Identify the missing words. The Chernobyl effect? Tourism booming in _____________ ______________ as visitors pile in to see town almost flooded off the map

Correct! Wrong!

Returning to Hurricane Dorian, who used a sharpie to attempt to defended his false claim that Hurricane Dorian was likely to hit Alabama?

An image of Hurricane Dorian edited using a Sharpie
Correct! Wrong!

President Donald Trump was the one who used a black Sharpie marker to alter an official National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration map to include Alabama in Hurricane Dorian's trajectory during an Oval Office presentation earlier this week, The Washington Post reported.

Future global food supplies could be under threat due to declining supplies of which mineral?

Food Resources
Correct! Wrong!

According to the Independent 'phosphate fertiliser 'crisis' threatens world food supply'. The use of essential rock phosphate has soared, but scientists fear it could run out within a few decades.

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Which country's mountain lost its highest peak title due to global heating?

Correct! Wrong!

The mountain peak known to Swedes as their country’s highest can no longer lay claim to the title due to global heating, scientists have confirmed, as the glacier at its summit shrinks amid soaring Arctic temperatures.

Which area of the UK exceeded its renewables target for electricity a year ahead of time?

Correct! Wrong!

A Stormont target on electricity from renewables has been exceeded a year ahead of time. The target was for 40% of power in Northern Ireland to be generated from renewable sources by 2020. But statistics published early in September show that for the 12 months to June 2019, the figure stood at 44%, the vast bulk of which was generated by wind.

On the 26th September 2019 a city-sized iceberg separated from which ice shelf?

Correct! Wrong!

Which hurricane broke the record for the strongest storm to reach the north and east of the Atlantic Ocean?

Correct! Wrong!

"The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us, I say - we will never forgive you." Who said this in a speech in September 2019.

Correct! Wrong!

Advertisement

Scientists believe a giant floating island of pumice could help restore which ecosystem?

The Guardian
Correct! Wrong!

Scientists believe a giant floating island of pumice could help restore Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. The pumice came from an underwater volcano that erupted near North Tonga and formed a floating island about the size of Manhattan. As it heads towards Australia’s northeastern coast, scientists say living organisms will hitch a ride on the pumice and bring new life to the ailing coral reefs.

David Attenborough made a plea to save which natural environment in the UK?

Correct! Wrong!

Sir David has backed an initiative by the Sussex Wildlife Trust and the Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority to introduce an inshore trawler exclusion zone to help the kelp regenerate.

The UK's new polar research ship, which was nearly named Boaty McBoatface after an online poll, was named after which person?

Correct! Wrong!

On what date did millions of people around the world take part in the first "climate strike" day?

Correct! Wrong!

Research published in September suggests what 'leaks billions of microplastics'?

Correct! Wrong!

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Which country experienced a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on the 25th September 2019?

BBC
Correct! Wrong!

A report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that melting ice from Greenland, Antarctica and glaciers elsewhere is driving up sea levels across the globe. According to researchers how many people are predicted to be living in coastal areas at risk of flooding by the end of the century?

Correct! Wrong!

True or false? The governing body of European football says it's going to plant 50,000 trees in the Republic of Ireland to offset emissions from people travelling to Euro 2020 matches.

Planting trees (afforestation)
Correct! Wrong!

There were fears in September that a glacier could collapse on which European mountain?

Crevasses in a glacier in the Swiss Alps
Correct! Wrong!

Which new "life-saving" app was used by a Scottish ambulance crew to establish the location of an injured hillwalker?

Correct! Wrong!

Geography in the News - September 2019
You are a legend!

Awesome! Well done. You're up to date with your geography in the news.
Not bad

Not bad, but not brilliant. Have another go.
Must try harder

Disappointing. Have a look at the news a bit more often!
You're a historian in disguise!

Oh dear. That's pretty tragic.

Share your Results:

Summer 2019 Geography in the News Quiz

Geography has been in the news all summer! Have you got what it takes to beat the Summer 2019 Geography in the News Quiz?



0%

Over the summer sea defences have been constructed between Bacton and Walcott on the Norfolk Coast. What is the name of the technique being used?

Sediment pumped onto the beach is moved by heavy machinery Internet Geography
Correct! Wrong!

Sandscaping is the name of the processes which involves building up beach material by pumping sand onto the beach from off-shore sources.

Earth Overshoot Day marks the date when humanity’s annual demand on nature exceeds what Earth’s ecosystems can regenerate in that year. What date was it this year?

Correct! Wrong!

Earth overshoot day was 29th July 2019. Over the past 20 years, it has moved up two months to July 29, the earliest ever.

In July, which country broke a world record by planting 350 million trees in one day?

BBC
Correct! Wrong!

Ethiopia holds the record for planting the most trees in a day. Previously, the world Record for planting trees in a single day was held by India, which used 800,000 volunteers to plant more than 50 million trees in 2016.

Across which border were a set of fluorescent pink seesaws built by a pair of professors seeking to bring a playful concept of unity to the two sides of the divide?

Pink Seesaws NBC News
Correct! Wrong!

Installed along the steel border fence on the outskirts of El Paso in Texas and Ciudad Juárez in Mexico, the seesaws are the invention of Ronald Rael, a professor of architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello, an associate professor of design at San José State University, who first came up with the concept 10 years ago.

In July, flash flooding in Yorkshire led to the destruction of a bridge close to which settlement?

BBC
Correct! Wrong!

The bridge is located close to Grinton.

In July, the UK experienced its hottest day on record. What was the highest temperature recorded in the UK?

The Evening Standard
Correct! Wrong!

In July, the UK experienced its hottest day on record when temperatures reached a record-breaking 38.7°C at Cambridge University Botanic Gardens.

In the afternoon of Thursday 1st August the 1500 of the 6500 residents of Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire were evacuated due to the increased risk of the dam wall at which reservoir collapsing?

Google Earth
Correct! Wrong!

The Toddbrook reservoir had to be reinforced to reduce the risk of collapse. This was don by the RAF dropping bags of ballast onto the damaged dam.

Name the typhoon that killed 44 people in eastern China after landslide and floods in August.

The Guardian
Correct! Wrong!

The typhoon that affected China in August was Lekima.

In August it was announced drugs show ‘90% survival rate’ in a breakthrough trial for which virus?

Medical Xpress
Correct! Wrong!

Ebola may soon be a "preventable and treatable" disease after a trial of two drugs showed significantly improved survival rates, scientists have said. Four drugs were trialled on patients in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where there is a major outbreak of the virus. More than 90% of infected people can survive if treated early with the most effective drugs, the research showed.

Where did rare lightening strikes occur on 10th August 2019?

National Geographic
Correct! Wrong!

The North Pole lightning was detected by The National Weather Service of Fairbanks, a mere 300 miles from the North Pole between 4 pm and 6 pm on August 10.

In which city did a devastating slum fire destroy homes of more than 10,000 people?

Correct! Wrong!

A devastating slum fire in Dhaka, Bangladesh, destroyed homes of more than 10,000 people. The majority of the slum's residents are low-paid workers from nearby garment factories.

Which country mourned the death of a glacier in August 2019?

Euro News
Correct! Wrong!

Ok Glacier is the first in Iceland to be formally declared dead ice.

President Trump announced he wanted to buy Greenland in August 2019. Greenland is an autonomous territory within the Kingdom of which country?

Correct! Wrong!

Greenland is an autonomous territory within the Kingdom of Greenland.

In August which city tightened rules on skyscrapers over wind tunnel fears?

Daily Mail
Correct! Wrong!

Tougher building rules for skyscrapers have been drawn up by the City of London because of concerns that a high-rise, urban microclimate will generate winds capable of knocking over cyclists and pedestrians.

Who sailed the Atlantic Ocean to participate in UN climate summits in New York City and Chile?

Correct! Wrong!

Greta Thunberg sailed across the Atlantic.

President Trump was also in the news in August suggesting nuclear weapons should be used to combat which natural hazard?

Getty Images
Correct! Wrong!

Using nuclear weapons to destroy hurricanes is not a good idea according to the US scientific agency. You know this, I know this, he doesn't know this.

Which disease did the UK lose its eradicated status by the World Health Organisation in August 2019?

NHS Direct
Correct! Wrong!

Measles has returned to four European nations previously seen as free of the illness, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The disease is no longer considered eradicated in Albania, the Czech Republic, Greece and the UK.

Identify two ecosystems affected by wild-fires during August 2019.

ABC News
Correct! Wrong!

Wildfires affected both tropical rainforests and tundra during August 2019.

Which celebrity and environmental campaigner announced a $5 million pledge to help reduce the number of fires in the Amazon rainforest?

Correct! Wrong!

Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio has announced a $5 million pledge to help reduce the number of fires in the Amazon rainforest. It comes amid a global outcry over fires in the Brazilian Amazon, with celebrities calling for action and pledging to donate to efforts in order to tackle the issue.

The outlook for which World Heritage site was officially downgraded from poor to very poor due to climate change?

UNESCO
Correct! Wrong!

The Great Barrier Reef's outlook has been officially downgraded from poor to very poor due to climate change. Rising sea temperatures thanks to human-driven global warming remain the biggest threat to the reef, a five-year Australian government report says.

Geography in the News Summer 2019
Oh dear. You're Donald Trump.

Hi Donald, thanks for having a go at the summer 2019 geography quiz. Don't go nuking any hurricanes now.
You're an advisor to Donald Trump?

Oh dear, you're probably qualified to advise Donald Trump. You could do with reading the news a bit more often.
You're no Donald Trump!

Not bad. You're probably smarter than Donald Trump. Keep reading and watching the news.
Geography legend!

Well done. You know your geography in the news. You're smart and know what's going on around the world. You are or should be a geography teacher. Get some leather elbow patches like those above.

Share your Results:




If you are looking for strategies to encourage your students to pay more attention to geography in the news, take a look at our free homework template to support them structure their research.

Geography in the News 12

Geography in the News 12

Geography in the News has been created to encourage students to read more widely, examining synoptic links and keep up to date with geography-related news. It has been developed to be given to students as homework and includes differentiated activities for them to complete. Our downloadable homework comes in an editable format so you can make adjustments appropriate to your students. We’ll be publishing a new homework relating to a recent event in the news every week during term time.

A peer/self-assessment sheet will soon be made available to download so students can peer/self assess their homework to help reduce your workload. You can access past mark schemes by signing up to a free subscription to Internet Geography.

Our twelfth homework is based on an article on The Guardian website examines the impact of Cyclone Idai on Mozambique. View the article.

Rather than setting a series of comprehension activities we are trialling the use of dual coding. We’ve set up some support resources for students who are unfamiliar with dual coding here. We’d love to hear what you think about using this technique. Please contact us and let us know what you think.

Homework Plus Features

If you are looking for a more open-ended approach to setting home Geography in the News homework take a look at our new template.

If you like Geography in the News please consider subscribing to Internet Geography Homework Plus. This is a new development on Internet Geography. We regularly publish homework to support skills development at GCSE. Homeworks will include the opportunity to practise and develop map skills, exam technique and statistical skills. So far we’ve covered a range of skills including:

  • exam technique
  • 4/6 figure grid references
  • sketches from photographs
  • height on a map
  • longitude and latitude
  • mean, median & mode
  • range & interquartile range
  • gradient, contour & spot height
  • the direction a photo has been taken in
  • pie charts
  • bar graphs & histograms
  • line & compound graphs

Homework Plus assignments also come with a mark scheme that can be used by teachers or students for peer/self-assessment.

In addition to Homework Plus resources, you also have access to GEOGREVISE. We regularly publish resources based on a unit from the AQA GCSE Geography course. Every GEOGREVISE pack  includes:

  • A four-step guide to revision
  • A personal learning checklist (PLC) for a GCSE Geography unit
  • 10 strategies for revision
  • lots of retrieval practice questions for a GCSE Geography unit
  • Answers to all retrieval practice questions
  • An overview of retrieval practice for parents and copies of the questions to support parents in engaging with revision

This resource is ideal for class-based revision, intervention, homework and engaging parents in revision.

You will also have access to our new Geography Infographics and resources to support the new AQA GCSE Geography Pre-release.

Subscription for Homework Plus, including GEOGREVISE starts at only £20 per year for an individual class teacher. Also available are department level subscriptions for schools. Find out which subscription is right for you. By subscribing you’ll have instant access to all the documents published so far.

Download: Geography in the News 12

By downloading the document you agree not to edit the document header and footer before issuing to students. You also agree not to redistribute the document on a public forum e.g. TES, Schoolology or similar. You are welcome to share with students on services such as Show My Homework, however, do not make the document available to other users. 

Seen a useful article for our next Geography in the News? Please let us know using the form below.

Geography in the News 11

Geography in the News 11

Geography in the News has been created to encourage students to read more widely, examining synoptic links and keep up to date with geography-related news. It has been developed to be given to students as homework and includes differentiated activities for them to complete. Our downloadable homework comes in an editable format so you can make adjustments appropriate to your students. We’ll be publishing a new homework relating to a recent event in the news every week during term time.

A peer/self-assessment sheet will soon be made available to download so students can peer/self assess their homework to help reduce your workload. You can access past mark schemes by signing up to a free subscription to Internet Geography.

Our eleventh homework is based on an article on BBC website examines the morbid impact of melting glaciers on Mount Everest. View the article.

Homework Plus Features

If you are looking for a more open-ended approach to setting home Geography in the News homework take a look at our new template.

If you like Geography in the News please consider subscribing to Internet Geography Homework Plus. This is a new development on Internet Geography. We regularly publish homework to support skills development at GCSE. Homeworks will include the opportunity to practise and develop map skills, exam technique and statistical skills. So far we’ve covered a range of skills including:

  • exam technique
  • 4/6 figure grid references
  • sketches from photographs
  • height on a map
  • longitude and latitude
  • mean, median & mode
  • range & interquartile range
  • gradient, contour & spot height
  • the direction a photo has been taken in
  • pie charts
  • bar graphs & histograms
  • line & compound graphs

Homework Plus assignments also come with a mark scheme that can be used by teachers or students for peer/self-assessment.

In addition to Homework Plus resources, you also have access to GEOGREVISE. We regularly publish resources based on a unit from the AQA GCSE Geography course. Every GEOGREVISE pack  includes:

  • A four-step guide to revision
  • A personal learning checklist (PLC) for a GCSE Geography unit
  • 10 strategies for revision
  • lots of retrieval practice questions for a GCSE Geography unit
  • Answers to all retrieval practice questions
  • An overview of retrieval practice for parents and copies of the questions to support parents in engaging with revision

This resource is ideal for class-based revision, intervention, homework and engaging parents in revision.

You will also have access to our new Geography Infographics and resources to support the new AQA GCSE Geography Pre-release.

Subscription for Homework Plus, including GEOGREVISE starts at only £20 per year for an individual class teacher. Also available are department level subscriptions for schools. Find out which subscription is right for you. By subscribing you’ll have instant access to all the documents published so far.

Download: Geography in the News 11

By downloading the document you agree not to edit the document header and footer before issuing to students. You also agree not to redistribute the document on a public forum e.g. TES, Schoolology or similar. You are welcome to share with students on services such as Show My Homework, however, do not make the document available to other users. 

Seen a useful article for our next Geography in the News? Please let us know using the form below.

Geography in the News 10

Geography in the News 10

Geography in the News has been created to encourage students to read more widely, examining synoptic links and keep up to date with geography-related news. It has been developed to be given to students as homework and includes differentiated activities for them to complete. Our downloadable homework comes in an editable format so you can make adjustments appropriate to your students. We’ll be publishing a new homework relating to a recent event in the news every week during term time.

A peer/self-assessment sheet will soon be made available to download so students can peer/self assess their homework to help reduce your workload. You can access past mark schemes by signing up to a free subscription to Internet Geography.

Our tenth homework is based on an article on BBC website examining worldwide climate strikes by students. View the article.

Homework Plus Features

If you are looking for a more open-ended approach to setting home Geography in the News homework take a look at our new template.

If you like Geography in the News please consider subscribing to Internet Geography Homework Plus. This is a new development on Internet Geography. We regularly publish homework to support skills development at GCSE. Homeworks will include the opportunity to practise and develop map skills, exam technique and statistical skills. So far we’ve covered a range of skills including:

  • exam technique
  • 4/6 figure grid references
  • sketches from photographs
  • height on a map
  • longitude and latitude
  • mean, median & mode
  • range & interquartile range
  • gradient, contour & spot height
  • the direction a photo has been taken in
  • pie charts
  • bar graphs & histograms
  • line & compound graphs

Homework Plus assignments also come with a mark scheme that can be used by teachers or students for peer/self-assessment.

In addition to Homework Plus resources, you also have access to our weekly GEOGREVISE. Each week we publish resources based on a unit from the AQA GCSE Geography course. Every GEOGREVISE pack  includes:

  • A four-step guide to revision
  • A personal learning checklist (PLC) for a GCSE Geography unit
  • 10 strategies for revision
  • lots of retrieval practice questions for a GCSE Geography unit
  • Answers to all retrieval practice questions
  • An overview of retrieval practice for parents and copies of the questions to support parents in engaging with revision

This resource is ideal for class-based revision, intervention, homework and engaging parents in revision.

You will also have access to our new Geography Infographics.

Subscription for Homework Plus, including GEOGREVISE starts at only £20 per year for an individual class teacher. Also available are department level subscriptions for schools. Find out which subscription is right for you. By subscribing you’ll have instant access to all the documents published so far.

Download: Geography in the News 10

By downloading the document you agree not to edit the document header and footer before issuing to students. You also agree not to redistribute the document on a public forum e.g. TES, Schoolology or similar. You are welcome to share with students on services such as Show My Homework, however, do not make the document available to other users. 

Seen a useful article for our next Geography in the News? Please let us know using the form below.

Geography in the News 9

Geography in the News 9

Geography in the News has been created to encourage students to read more widely, examining synoptic links and keep up to date with geography-related news. It has been developed to be given to students as homework and includes differentiated activities for them to complete. Our downloadable homework comes in an editable format so you can make adjustments appropriate to your students. We’ll be publishing a new homework relating to a recent event in the news every week during term time.

A peer/self-assessment sheet will soon be made available to download so students can peer/self assess their homework to help reduce your workload. You can access past mark schemes by signing up to a free subscription to Internet Geography.

Our ninth homework is based on an article on The Guardian website examines changes in the predicted life expectancy for people in the UK. View the article.

Homework Plus Features

If you are looking for a more open-ended approach to setting home Geography in the News homework take a look at our new template.

If you like Geography in the News please consider subscribing to Internet Geography Homework Plus. This is a new development on Internet Geography. We regularly publish homework to support skills development at GCSE. Homeworks will include the opportunity to practise and develop map skills, exam technique and statistical skills. So far we’ve covered a range of skills including:

  • exam technique
  • 4/6 figure grid references
  • sketches from photographs
  • height on a map
  • longitude and latitude
  • mean, median & mode
  • range & interquartile range
  • gradient, contour & spot height
  • the direction a photo has been taken in
  • pie charts
  • bar graphs & histograms
  • line & compound graphs

Homework Plus assignments also come with a mark scheme that can be used by teachers or students for peer/self-assessment.

In addition to Homework Plus resources, you also have access to our weekly GEOGREVISE. Each week we publish resources based on a unit from the AQA GCSE Geography course. Every GEOGREVISE pack  includes:

  • A four-step guide to revision
  • A personal learning checklist (PLC) for a GCSE Geography unit
  • 10 strategies for revision
  • lots of retrieval practice questions for a GCSE Geography unit
  • Answers to all retrieval practice questions
  • An overview of retrieval practice for parents and copies of the questions to support parents in engaging with revision

This resource is ideal for class-based revision, intervention, homework and engaging parents in revision.

You will also have access to our new Geography Infographics.

Subscription for Homework Plus, including GEOGREVISE starts at only £20 per year for an individual class teacher. Also available are department level subscriptions for schools. Find out which subscription is right for you. By subscribing you’ll have instant access to all the documents published so far.

Download: Geography in the News 9

By downloading the document you agree not to edit the document header and footer before issuing to students. You also agree not to redistribute the document on a public forum e.g. TES, Schoolology or similar. You are welcome to share with students on services such as Show My Homework, however, do not make the document available to other users. 

Seen a useful article for our next Geography in the News? Please let us know using the form below.